Tuesday, December 06, 2016

WORLD WHALE BUZZ is out! Edition of 02 December 2016

WORLD WHALE BUZZ
Marine mammal news from around the world.
Published by
Art MacKay
02 December 2016
Science Leisure Environment Adult Art & Entertainment Sports #whales #ocean
Today's headline
10 essential dolphin and whale-watching trips | Travel Feature
thumbnail www­.roughguides­.com - From whales in Iceland to the pink penguins of Hong Kong harbour, here's ten of our favourite holidays for seeing whales and dolphins, taken from the pages of travel bible Great Escapes. Let us kno...
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Tuesday, November 29, 2016

PACIFIC: We Can Save Southern Resident Orcas

By: Quinn Read
More at: http://www.defendersblog.org/2016/11/can-save-southern-resident-orcas/

© Art MacKay 2016

Facing toxic pollution and an alarming food shortage, Southern Resident orcas are on a steep decline. But removing several dams could be the key to saving them.

When I was a little girl, my family went camping in the San Juan Islands. I slept out in the open, curled up in my sleeping bag, close enough to the water’s edge to hear the waves lapping up against the shore. When I woke, my face was covered in angry, red mosquito bites. I sat up and wiped the sleep out of my eyes, and that’s when I saw the line of sleek black and white bodies surfacing in the distance. It was one of the Puget Sound’s pods of Southern Resident Orcas. I temporarily forgot all about my very itchy face. I watched their tall dorsal fins carve a path through the water, and even then, I knew how lucky I was to see them.
That was 1992, and the population of Southern Resident Orcas hovered at around 90. That was also the year that J28 was born into the family of orcas known as J pod. She was one of six calves born into the Southern Resident population that year, and by all accounts, was a healthy and thriving youngster. When she was nine years old, she turned up with an obvious nick in her dorsal fin that made her easy to identify for scientists and excited whale watchers. She gave birth to her first calf, her daughter J46, in 2009. And she gave birth to her second live-born calf, her son J54, at the very end of 2015.
Unfortunately, J28 never quite recovered from complications after J54’s birth. This summer, she was visibly malnourished. And on October 28th, the Center for Whale Research confirmed her death. That left the survival of ten-month old J54, who was still nursing, very much in question. In the wake of his mother’s death, J54’s family did everything they could do give him a fighting chance. His older sister offered him salmon and repeatedly shoved him to the surface to breathe. A heartbreaking photo of his scored and scratched dorsal fin shows the results of his family’s attempts to hold onto him. But it wasn’t enough, and now J54 is gone too.
Today, with the tragic deaths of J28 and J54, there are just 80 of these incredible creatures left. What’s going on here? Why was this otherwise healthy orca unable to recover from birth complications? And why has this population continued to decline since my childhood encounter — despite being federally listed as endangered, and despite the development of recovery plans to try and save them?
 

Pollution and Food Shortage a Double Hit to Southern Residents

Friday, November 25, 2016

WORLD WHALE BUZZ is out! Edition of 25 November 2016

WORLD WHALE BUZZ
Marine mammal news from around the world.
Published by
Art MacKay
25 November 2016
Science Environment Leisure Adult World Politics #whales #ocean
Today's headline
Sperm Whales Bring New Lingo to New Neighborhoods
thumbnail news­.nationalgeographic­.com - The whales had disappeared, and now they were back. Or were they? Since 1985, Hal Whitehead had been leading a team to the Galápagos Islands to search for sperm whales, which gather there in the th...


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Thursday, November 24, 2016

WORLD WHALE BUZZ is out! Edition of 18 November 2016

WORLD WHALE BUZZ
Marine mammal news from around the world.
Published by
Art MacKay
18 November 2016
Science Environment Leisure Adult Art & Entertainment Business #whales #ocean
Today's headline
Pilot whales babysit each other's young while swimming in groups
thumbnail www­.newscientist­.com - It takes a village to raise a whale. Rather than sticking exclusively to their mothers' side, baby pilot whales in the north Atlantic take turns swimming next to other adults – including both femal...
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Tuesday, November 01, 2016

Humpback Whale and Marine Mammal Field Techniques Programs

Humpback Whale and Marine Mammal Field Techniques Programs in Puerto Rico, USA.

Registration now open for the 7th season with The Marine and Coastal Ecology Research Center. Programs for winter 2017 are being subsidized by MCERC resulting in a reduced registration fee for these field intensive programs.

Humpback Whale Field Intensive Program    (January through April 2017- week long sessions) $900USD
Marine Mammal Field Techniques Program  (January  2017 – single week long session)             $900USD
Marine Mammal Field Techniques Program (including Open Water Diving Certification)   
                                                                                (January 2017; single 10 day session)                     $1825USD

Spaces are very limited to 6 participants for the Marine Mammal Field Techniques and Humpback Whale Field Intensive (per session). The Marine Mammal Field Techniques with SUBA certification has 8 spots available as of this posting. If Spring Break week is important to you, please plan to register as soon as possible.
The MCERC field station in Puerto Rico, USA houses all program participants while we focus on building field skills and resumes for anybody interested in marine mammal science. These positions are also suitable for internships, and many of our students receive up to 3 undergraduate credit hours through independent study with a faculty member from their campus.
The program fee covers room and meals for the week long session, instruction, transportation to all field excursions, and equipment necessary for the program (SCUBA certification requires minimal, personal equipment provided by students). There is no cost associated with participating in data collection during the Humpback Whale Field Intensive program. During this program, students are critical members of our data collection team.

The program fee does not include travel to and from Boquerón, Puerto Rico, USA. Citizens of the USA do not need a passport to travel to Puerto Rico (at this time), the currency is the US Dollar, and most major cell phone carriers have service on the island.

There is no application process required. Interested people should visit the websites below to learn more details about the programs, then request passcodes to the Education Hub to register by emailing Nicole.MCERC@gmail.com or MCERC.mail@gmail.com.

website                       www.Marine-Eco.org
Education Hub          www.Marine-Eco.org/mcerc-moodle
Photo Gallery             www.Marine-Eco.jimdo.com
Facebook                    www.Facebook.com/researchcenter
Twitter                       @MCERCMarineEco
LinkedIn                    https://www.linkedin.com/in/mithriel-mackay-12364330


Marine and Coastal Ecology Research Center Inc.
Spring Hill, Florida 
Research station: Boqueron, Puerto Rico, USA

WORLD WHALE BUZZ is out! Edition of 28 October 2016

WORLD WHALE BUZZ
Marine mammal news from around the world.
Published by
Art MacKay
28 October 2016
Science Environment Leisure Art & Entertainment Business Politics #whales #iwc66
Today's headline
World Must Tackle the Biggest Killer of Whales – and it's not Whaling
thumbnail www­.ipsnews­.net - Leigh Henry is Senior Policy Advisor, WWF Delegation to IWC66 Portoroz, Slovenia, Oct 24 2016 (IPS) - Every two years, governments from across the globe gather to debate the fate of the world's wha...
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Thursday, October 27, 2016

WORLD WHALE BUZZ is out! Edition of 21 October 2016

WORLD WHALE BUZZ
Marine mammal news from around the world.
Published by
Art MacKay
21 October 2016
Science Environment Leisure Adult World Sports #whales #whalewatching
Today's headline
Whales' dung is the real reason we need to stop hunting them
thumbnail www­.newscientist­.com - Sometimes it's pink, sometimes greeny-brown. But whatever the colour, whale dung could be the unlikely catalyst for ending whaling. The role of whale faeces in regenerating fish stocks will occupy ...
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Wednesday, October 19, 2016

BOOK COLLECTORS: Popular Zoology by Steele and Jenks 1887

Original is still available.

Friday, October 14, 2016

WORLD WHALE BUZZ is out! Edition of 14 October 2016

WORLD WHALE BUZZ
Marine mammal news from around the world.
Published by
Art MacKay
14 October 2016
Science Environment Leisure Adult World Sports #whales #whalewatching
Today's headline
The Lost Cultures of Whales
thumbnail www­.nytimes­.com - Aboard the Balaena, Caribbean — I am alone on deck, my headphones filled with the sounds of the deep ocean. I have been tracking the sperm whales since 4 a.m. Now the island of Dominica imposes its...
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